Very few battle names convey to Americans the terrible toll from the war  in the Pacific quite the way that Iwo Jima does. (Joe Rosenthal’s  famous photo of the stars and stripes being raised atop the island’s  Mount Suribachi suggested that the losses were worth the effort.) But  Eugene Smith’s masterly photo of a plane roaring over the flight deck of  a carrier, miles off of Iwo Jima, depicts another side of the conflict:  the wide-ranging array of forces — not only “boots on the sand,” but  enormous power by air and sea — that the U.S. military was bringing to  bear in the Pacific by early 1945

Very few battle names convey to Americans the terrible toll from the war in the Pacific quite the way that Iwo Jima does. (Joe Rosenthal’s famous photo of the stars and stripes being raised atop the island’s Mount Suribachi suggested that the losses were worth the effort.) But Eugene Smith’s masterly photo of a plane roaring over the flight deck of a carrier, miles off of Iwo Jima, depicts another side of the conflict: the wide-ranging array of forces — not only “boots on the sand,” but enormous power by air and sea — that the U.S. military was bringing to bear in the Pacific by early 1945

Very few battle names convey to Americans the terrible toll from the war  in the Pacific quite the way that Iwo Jima does. (Joe Rosenthal’s  famous photo of the stars and stripes being raised atop the island’s  Mount Suribachi suggested that the losses were worth the effort.) But  Eugene Smith’s masterly photo of a plane roaring over the flight deck of  a carrier, miles off of Iwo Jima, depicts another side of the conflict:  the wide-ranging array of forces — not only “boots on the sand,” but  enormous power by air and sea — that the U.S. military was bringing to  bear in the Pacific by early 1945

Very few battle names convey to Americans the terrible toll from the war in the Pacific quite the way that Iwo Jima does. (Joe Rosenthal’s famous photo of the stars and stripes being raised atop the island’s Mount Suribachi suggested that the losses were worth the effort.) But Eugene Smith’s masterly photo of a plane roaring over the flight deck of a carrier, miles off of Iwo Jima, depicts another side of the conflict: the wide-ranging array of forces — not only “boots on the sand,” but enormous power by air and sea — that the U.S. military was bringing to bear in the Pacific by early 1945

Posted 2 years ago & Filed under war, wwii, combat, iwo jima, pacific, 97 notes View high resolution

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